Research

New Study Sheds light on contagious cancer in Tasmanian devils

New Study Sheds light on contagious cancer in Tasmanian devils

Shedding light on devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), a new study has found that this communicable cancer has been spotted in eight Tasmanian devils across southeastern Tasmania. The diseases was first discovered in 1996 when it had brought the species to the brink of extinction notwithstanding efforts put in for their captive breeding and preparing an effective vaccine.

Ultrasounds can help detect breast cancer: study

Ultrasounds can help detect breast cancer: study

Ultrasound screening can play a crucial role in the fight against breast cancer as the technology is capable as mammograms in detecting the disease in women with dense breasts, a new study suggested.

The extensive study led by Pittsburgh researcher Wendie A. Berg revealed that ultrasound screening detected as many cases of breast cancer as mammogram screening in women with dense breasts.

Glowing Shark Named After Japanese Ninja

Glowing Shark Named After Japanese Ninja

A research was carried out to study a new species of glowing shark. The study appeared in the December edition of the Journal of the Ocean Science Foundation. The lead author of the paper, Vicky Vásquez, has given a more common name to the species, ninja lanternshark. The species were originally named Etmopterus benchleyi. This shark was found in 2010 offshore continental slope in the Pacific Ocean.

Over 500K pieces of debris orbiting Earth

Over 500K pieces of debris orbiting Earth

More than 500,000 pieces of debris are currently orbiting Earth, moving at speeds of up to 17,500 miles per hour (mph), according to the U.S. Space Surveillance Network.

As the U.S. Space Surveillance Network tracks only pieces larger than ten centimeters, the number of junk pieces in space could be much larger. Of the 500,000 pieces that are being currently be tracked, nearly 20,000 pieces range in size from a softball to a bus.

Asthma Rates High among Poor Children

Asthma Rates High among Poor Children

When seen from one side, it seems great to know that asthma prevalence has declined among children from developing countries. But on the other hand, there seem to have increasing trend in children from poor families. A retrospective analysis of National Health Interview Survey data from 2001-2013 has found huge increase in childhood asthma rates from 2001 to 2009 with 10% increase in 2009. The rate slightly leveled off by about 8% in 2013. But, the good thing to note is that researchers found that trends in childhood asthma have slightly stopped increasing.

NASA’s newly released Mars image shows boulder-covered landslip along a canyon wall

NASA’s newly released Mars image shows boulder-covered landslip along a canyon wall

The newly released image of a relatively fresh landslide on Mars, released by NASA, has showed boulder-covered landslip along a canyon wall. According to researchers, landslides occur when steep slopes fail, which makes huge amount of soil and rock flow downhill. This leaves behind a scarp at the top of the slope.

The mass of material comes to a still position on reaching shallower slopes, and forms a lobe of material, ending in a well-defined edge known as a toe.

Scientists hope to find cure for Alzheimer’s through Stem Cell research

Scientists hope to find cure for Alzheimer’s through Stem Cell research

One of the commonest causes of premature senility, Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive mental deterioration that occurs in middle or old age due to generalized degeneration of the brain. So far, scientists have failed to find any drug that can slow the onset of the disease and a major reason being cited for this is that animal testing, where most research begins, doesn’t often produce favorable results that can predict very well what will happen to people with the disease.

World's largest cloning factory has capabilities to create human clones

World's largest cloning factory has capabilities to create human clones

The largest cloning factory in the world has the ability to create human clones. The cloning giant of China, Boyalife Group, is going to produce one million replicated cows each year soon. It has added hundreds of cloned, bomb-sniffing dogs to the anti-terrorism campaign worldwide.

However, the chief executive of the company has insisted that humans are not going to be on the agenda any time soon, even if technology makes it possible.

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