Health

Measles, TB, Scurvy and Cholera rates rising in Britain: NHS

Measles, TB, Scurvy and Cholera rates rising in Britain: NHS

Cases of measles, tuberculosis, scurvy, whooping cough and cholera have witnessed an increase over the past five years in Britain, according to a new report published by the National Health Service. The diseases which have been almost wiped out in the developed countries for past few decades are possibly making a comeback. The NHS report indicated that there were 14,000 suspected cases of scarlet fever in year 2014, the highest since the 1960s.

Topics: 

FDA ends lifetime ban on gay blood donors

FDA ends lifetime ban on gay blood donors

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has finally lifted the lifetime ban on blood donations from bisexual and gay men, who are clinically referred to as ‘men who have sex with men’ (MSM).

The FDA’s new policy replaces the lifetime ban on gay and bisexual male blood donors with a one-year deferral for gay men. It means gay men must be celibate for at least one year for becoming eligible to donate blood.

Five Years Down the Line, Genome-Specific Diet could Help Keep Pounds Off

Five Years Down the Line, Genome-Specific Diet could Help Keep Pounds Off

Final countdown begins! In the chapter of obesity and measures to control it, a new point has come in front which states that person’s own genetic makeup plays key role in response to weight loss and gain. Just a matter of five years, and you will be presented with a master diet, based on individual patient’s genes, which will help you keep the pounds off permanently.

Largest-ever review of BP drugs suggests mass prescription could slash rate of strokes and heart attack

Largest-ever review of BP drugs suggests mass prescription could slash rate of strokes and heart attack

Blood pressure-lowering drugs should be given to lower the risk of heart disease, finds a major study led by Oxford University. Researchers have called for change in current rules that state only those having high blood pressure should be given the medication, so that people with normal blood pressure, but at risk of heart disease and stroke can also be saved.

Regular Blood Pressure Medication Important for People with High-risk Profile: Study

Regular Blood Pressure Medication Important for People with High-risk Profile: Study

People at high risk of cardiovascular ailments and stroke should regularly take pills to control their blood pressure, according to a new paper published in journal The Lancet. The latest call for a new treatment regimen is based on the assessment of 123 studies carried out between 1966 and 2015 in which more than 600,000 people were involved.

Topics: 

Holidays Can Be Threat for Your Pets

Holidays Can Be Threat for Your Pets

Holidays in short means fun time with friends, family and near and dear ones, but stop, are you forgetting some most important members of your family who can be at risk his holiday. Experts warn that holidays can bring potential hazard for your furry friends.

The Suffolk County SPCA suggests that by adopting some small and easy precautions you can make your pets safe these holidays.

Here are few suggestions you can follow. You should avoid tinsel because your pets may find it attractive or think it as a toy to play with and they may accidently swallow and get choked.

Americans Consuming Alcohol at a Record Rate: CDC

Americans Consuming Alcohol at a Record Rate: CDC

A recent report released by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has revealed some shocking data about consumption of alcohol in the United States. The report has shown that Americans are drinking alcohol at a record rate.

As per the report, alcohol-related deaths in US have increased 37% from 2002. Data has shown that from 2006 and 2010, excessive alcohol use claimed almost 88,000 deaths each year.

Experts in explanation said alcohol related deaths here do not mean deaths due to drink-and-drive, or accidents or homicides committed under its influence.

Topics: 

Kangaroo mother care can substantially reduce mortality in low-birth-weight newborns, Meta-analysis suggests

Kangaroo mother care can substantially reduce mortality in low-birth-weight newborns, Meta-analysis suggests

According to a meta-analysis, published online December 23 in Pediatrics, Kangaroo mother care (KMC) can considerably decrease mortality in low-birth-weight newborns. KMC is an intervention that aids skin-to-skin contact between newborn and mother.

Ellen O. Boundy, ScD, from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, and colleagues have also discovered that KMC can reduce the risk of hypothermia, hypoglycemia, neonatal sepsis, and hospital readmission in newborns and boost the likelihood of exclusive breast-feeding.

Guatemalan Man Being Held at Adelanto Detention Facility Dies of Heart Attack

Guatemalan Man Being Held at Adelanto Detention Facility Dies of Heart Attack

A Guatemalan man being held in an immigrant detention center in California died Wednesday after suffering a heart attack at Adelanto Detention Facility, as per a statement by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

ICE, law enforcement agency under the US Department of Homeland Security, announced the man, Jose Manuel Azurida-Hernandez, was taken to hospital on Saturday after a heart attack, but the 54-year-old Guatemala resident couldn’t recover and died Wednesday at an Inland Empire hospital.

Topics: 

Kangaroo mother care can reduce infant death rate: Research

Kangaroo mother care can reduce infant death rate: Research

Continuous skin-to-skin contact between mother and infant during the first few days of life has been found to improve the survival rates for infants with low birth weight. The study team found that infant death cases were down by more than 35 percent when there was more skin-to-skin contact between mother and child. The study was conducted by a team of medical researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Topics: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Health