AT&T acquires specific software assets along with some staff of Carrier IQ

AT&T acquires specific software assets along with some staff of Carrier IQ

AT&T has announced that it has acquired the rights to Carrier IQ’s software and some CIQ employees have also been moved to AT&T. Carrier IQ appears to have shut down, which came under scrutiny in 2011 as people came to know about its practices of getting hold of the user data on more than 140 million mobile devices.

AT&T has signed on as a customer years ago to access the CIQ software across phones in its network with a purpose to troubleshoot wireless quality for its customers. The company spokesman said that today also it is the similar case.

“We use CIQ software solely to improve the customer’s network and wireless service experience. This is in line with our Privacy Policy and provides a great benefit to users of our network”, said the company’s spokesperson.

Earlier, it was being said that Carrier IQ is being purchased in which two high-profile companies have been involved. There were rumors that Nielson was involved in the acquisition. But when asked from Nielson, it refused to be aware of the matter.

Latest round of speculation states that Nielson will be licensing specific CIQ technology from AT&T. Like AT&T, Nielsen is also working with Carrier IQ for past many years. Nielson uses CIQ software also to measure network performance related to services and ads.

Ericsson, IBM, Symphony Teleca and Teradata are the other customers and partners of Carrier IQ. For now, terms of the deal, with AT&T and Nielson have not been disclosed.

Carrier IQ as mentioned above rose to prominence in 2011 owing to the CIQ code it installed on smartphones. The list was described by Carrier IQ executive as a treasure trove, which included logging web usage, app usage, battery life and more. The companies were found to be using the data and owing to it class-action suits were filed and some of them have been settled.

TechCrunch reported that, TechCrunch has confirmed that AT&T has acquired certain software assets from Carrier iQ, along with some staff. The site itself — and the wider company, it seems — has gone offline.

“We’ve acquired the rights to Carrier iQ’s software, and some CIQ employees moved to AT&T,” an AT&T spokesperson tells us. AT&T signed on as a customer years ago to use the CIQ software across phones on its network to troubleshoot wireless quality for its customers, and the spokesperson went on to explain that this still the case.

TheVerge report said, the fallout from the Carrier IQ discovery was swift and widespread, foreshadowing the privacy debate that Edward Snowden's NSA leaks would later engender. The tracking software was revealed to be on 150 million smartphones at the time, leading to numerous telcos and handset manufacturers like Apple, HTC, T-Mobile, and Blackberry either admitting to their installing CIQ or categorically denying that they did. Sprint went on to remove the software outright. After the imbroglio, the Mobile Device Privacy Act was introduced in Congress to prevent this exact kind of data collection. However, the legislation never passed.

According to the Engadget, Carrier IQ came under scrutiny in 2011 as the public learned about its practices of capturing the user data on more than 140 million mobile devices. The company logged where and when people made calls or sent text messages, which apps they used, how they used the web and other mobile habits, and it was employed by major carriers including Sprint, Apple, AT&T and HTC.

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