BBC Website Back to Normal after being Hit by Online Attack

BBC Website Back to Normal after being Hit by Online Attack

Gone were the times when hacking used to cause goose bumps! In the era of computer world and technology, being system hacked is not something surprising. Similar attack happened with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) company reported on Thursday that its digital services had been shut down temporarily in what its news operation described as a hacking attack. On Thursday morning, many of the BBC’s websites and popular video-on-demand services were offline for about three hours, though its television and radio stations were not affected with the attack.

As per the statement from the company, the blackout had been caused by a technical issue. Some unidentified people in the company were quoted on the BBC news website as saying that a ‘distributed denial of service’ (DDos) attack had struck the digital services. The point to be noted is that the online attack was caused when a website is deliberately targeted with a high level of online visitors to create congestion, overloading the services and taking them offline.

But despite of all the attacks, the good part is that the BBC site is back to normal and operating successfully. The company said that they feel apologize of any inconvenience caused to the users. Another interesting point to note is that BBC is not the first news media organization to be hit by hackers, the New York Times website was temporarily shut down after the company’s domain name registrar was hit by the Syrian hackers in 2013. The Financial Times and The Washington Post have faced similar attacks. As per the statement by the company, the DDos attack left attackers send a huge amount of requests to a specific website, leaving it unable to deal with them all and knocking it offline.

It has been reported that during the time of the attack, all of the BBC’s websites as well as online services like the iPlayer and its news sites were inaccessible.

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