Sudden cardiac arrest may not always be so sudden

Sudden cardiac arrest may not always be so sudden

It is not always that sudden cardiac arrest is so sudden, as a latest research has suggested that a lot of people could ignore potentially life-saving warning signs long before they collapse.

In the US, cardiac arrest takes nearly 350,000 lives every year. It is quite worse than a mere heart attack, as the heart suddenly stops beating, its electrical activity gets knocked out of rhythm. Some critical time can be bought by CPR but very few patients survive that it’s very tough to tell how reliable the longtime medical belief is that it’s a strike with tiny or no advance warning.

A strange research that has closely tracked sudden cardiac arrest in Portland, Oregon, for over 10 years has given way to that roadblock with the help of interviews with witnesses, family and friends after the collapse of patients and by tracking down patients’ medical records.

On Monday, researchers reported that nearly 50% of middle-aged patients for whom symptom information could be discovered had faced warning signs, including chest pain or shortness of breath, in the month prior to suffering a cardiac arrest.

The study has offered the possibility of a day when some cardiac arrests could be prevented if doctors may determine how to find and treat the most vulnerable people.

Dr. Sumeet Chugh of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, who led the study reported in Annals of Internal Medicine, said, “By the time the 911 call is made, it’s much too late for at least 90 percent of people. There’s this window of opportunity that we really didn’t know existed”.

According to a report from the HuffingtonPost, an unusual study that has closely tracked sudden cardiac arrest in Portland, Oregon, for over a decade got around that roadblock, using interviews with witnesses, family and friends after patients collapse and tracking down their medical records.

About half of middle-aged patients for whom symptom information could be found had experienced warning signs, mostly chest pain or shortness of breath, in the month before suffering a cardiac arrest, researchers reported Monday. The research offers the possibility of one day preventing some cardiac arrests if doctors could figure out how to find and treat the people most at risk.

An unusual study that has closely tracked sudden cardiac arrest in Portland, Oregon, for more than a decade got around that roadblock, using interviews with witnesses, family and friends after patients collapse and tracking down their medical records. About half of middle-aged patients for whom symptom information could be found had experienced warning signs, mostly chest pain or shortness of breath, in the month before suffering a cardiac arrest, researchers reported Monday. The research offers the possibility of one day preventing some cardiac arrests if doctors could figure out how to find and treat the people most at risk, told the DailyProgress.

The GlobeGazette notes that, CPR can buy critical time, but so few patients survive that it’s been hard to tell if the longtime medical belief is correct that it’s a strike with little or no advance warning.

An unusual study that has closely tracked sudden cardiac arrest in Portland, Oregon, for over a decade got around that roadblock, using interviews with witnesses, family and friends after patients collapse and tracking down their medical records.