Alcohol Related Hospital Admissions on Rise

Alcohol Related Hospital Admissions on Rise

The Nuffield Trust report has revealed the extent of alcohol related hospital admissions in England and the impact of demographic, socio-economic and regional factors on these numbers. The report suggests a 63.6% rise in the hospital admissions particularly due to alcohol during 2005-6 and 2013-14. Further breakdown reveals a 53.9% rise in emergency admissions from 374.9 per 100,000 to 577.1 per 100,000 population.

The report also revealed that A&E admission rates owing to alcohol poisoning were up by 104.6% to 148.8 per 100,000 from 72.7 per 100,000 of population during the six year period of 2008-9 to 2013-14. Alcohol poisoning occur maximum in the age group of 15-24 years, with females in the age group of 15-19 years accounting for 1.5 times than the males in that group.

On demographic level, hospital admission rates were higher in north of England compared to other regions. From Socio-economic point of view, people coming in the category of 20% most deprived regions contributed 3.5 times more to the alcohol poisoning cases.

“With the Christmas party season in full swing, it’s worth considering the full burden over-indulgence in alcohol is placing on our NHS, as well as the obvious human cost,” said joint author of the report, Claire Currie. The co-author added that this concern has to be jointly resolved by hospitals and the government by taking steps to control the rising numbers. The government can implement a minimum unit pricing policy, along with limiting the availability as well as marketing and advertising of alcohol.